Tuesday, October 25, 2011

261011 BLOK, Auckland, N.Z.



This segment of my N.Z. cycling trip, north of Auckland, I must dedicate to Jim Berger, my host.  His house in Mt. Eden so full of books, music and other, there's hardly space for much else!  But, it's where I discovered the following quote by Alfred Lord Tennyson, in a book entitled, 'The Literary Cyclist:'

"Nor in vain the distance beckons.
Forward, forward let us range!
Let the great world spin forever,
Down the ringing grooves of change."

'Locksley Hall'

Jim, is unique!  He trims the ivy growing on the outer walls of his garage (full of bicycles) with an electric lawn mower.  One has to see this to believe (picture)!  A veritable walking encyclopedia of music; sports he plays chess, cooks and discusses the intricacies of basketball (which he still plays at age 62).  I want to ask him, 'Is there anything you don't know about?'

But, tomorrow Mr. Fetes and I depart for one month discovering the north of North Island (New Zealand). (Up) and 'down the ringing grooves of change!'

If you have a question about music and sports contact me, and I'll convey to Jim.  Me, I know little about either.

If, however, you have a question about tour cycling I might be the one...

F.A. Hutchison

P.S.  By the way, I'll be meeting up with Alvaro somewhere 'out there!'

Sunday, October 23, 2011

241011, Monday, 'Labor Day' in New Zealand.


241011, Monday, 'Labor Day' in New Zealand.

I've been here in Auckland, N.Z. for three weeks.  Time flies like an albatross!

I've been staying with host, Jim Berger, an expatriate American, whose lived in this house in Mt. Eden for almost 25 years.  He's a collector of books,  bicycles, and music.  We've had a good time together, him calling up much of my past (as I haven't thought about since being on the road).  

He knew of, and had all of Eric Anderson's music, an artist/poet of the Sixties, one that I resonated when 'Make Love, Not War!' was the order of the day!  In fact, I read the following lyrics, while I play the music of my favorite Eric Anderson song entitled,  'Thirsty Boots:'

"You've long been on the open road, sleepin' in the rain.
From dirty words and muddy cells your clothes are smeared and stained.
But, the dirty words and muddy cells will soon be judged insane!
So, stop and rest yourself, 'til you'll be off again!

Oh, take off your thirsty boots and stay for awhile.
Your feet are hot and weary from a dusty mile.
And maybe I can make you laugh, and maybe I can try,
I'm just looking for the evening, the morning in your eye.

But,  tell me of the ones you saw, as far as you could see.
Across the plains from field to town, a marchin' to be free!
And of the rusted prison gates that tumble by degree,
Like laughin' children one by one,
They look like you and me.

So, take of your thirsty boots and stay for awhile.
Your feet are hot and weary from a dusty mile.
And maybe I can make you laugh and maybe I can try,
I'm just looking for the evening and the morning in your eye!

(harmonica bridge)

I know you are no stranger down the crooked rainbow trail.
From dancing cliff edge shattered sills of slandered shackled jails.
Where the voices drift up from below as walls are being scaled.
Yes, all of this and more my friend your song shall not befail!

So, take off your thirsty boots and stay for awhile.
Your feet are hot and weary, from a dusty mile.
And maybe I can make you laugh, and maybe I can try,
I'm just looking for the evening and the morning in your eye!

Yes, you've long been on the open road, sleepin' in the rain.
From dirty words and muddy cells your clothes are smeared and stained.
But, the dirty words and the muddy cells will soon be hid in shame!
So, stop and rest yourself, 'til you're off again!

Oh, take off your thirsty boots and stay for awhile.
Your feet are hot and weary, from a dusty mile.
And maybe I can make you laugh, and maybe I can try,
I'm just looking for the evening and the morning in your eye!"

In fact, I'm making a music video of such with ME mouthing the lyrics.  I hope to add to www.cyclingpeace.org when completed.  But, I have to do some fancy editing (probably at a post house) before.

Additionally, I wrote the following poem for Jim, as he's all about baseball, basketball, bicycles, and books:

THE NINE 'BEES!'

Books,
Base and
Basket
Balls!
Bicycles,
In the land of Berger with
Beaches,
'Buying' rugs;
Blacks of All
Fighting for tries
Living in
Nature's green splendor!

It rains,
But no disdain.
Where every turn
Pictures reveal
Taking worth!

Hutch spelling
'Bees'
Thanks to Jim
Who cooks up
'The Nine;'
Wine and songs,
Without honey!

Marty helped me turn these words into a picture, nee gift for Jim.

Alvaro (www.biciclown.com), the Spanish clown/world cyclist and I  met up in Auckland (by chance).  Amazingly, he ended up staying in Mt. Eden, just a baseball throw away from Jim's house on Ashton Road.  He'd cycled in from the airport in the rain, but a cyclist helped him find his way to Mt. Eden.  

CYCLISTS UNITE!  WE WILL INHERIT THE ROADS AND HIGHWAYS OF THE WORLD (when there is no more oil)! 

It's been raining much, just like Adelaide, Australia (some 2,200KM to the west)!  

We seem to bring the rain everywhere we go!  Or, this must be global warming?  

Auckland is almost an island on a narrow spit of land north on the North Island, N.Z.  Thus, the oceans influence the weather, the high humidity not my kind of climate (Rucha you would like it.).  I think I'm looking forward to more summer-dry south on South Island.

Soon, we'll be cycling north to the northern most tip (of North Island); out of Auckland for at least one month.  Note, our group getting some relief from 'the barrage' (as few WIFI connections)!

Cycling in N.Z. we're yet to discover, but the first 'taste,' is similar to Australia, the masses worshiping the motor vehicle.  You take your life in your hands 'out there,' as the roads narrow, and drivers in a massive hurry!  I've been yelled at, young boys trying to scare me (and they did)!  Additionally, it's all up and down steep, but short, hills.  You do much shifting, and using the brakes.  In Australia, just the opposite, with long stretches where you hardly shift or brake.

I've gotten fat and lazy the last three months off the road, living in the luxury of a warm house, and soft bed! But, I long for my 'home' the road!

Hutch
spanning the globe to bring you the constant variety!

P.S.  Alvaro has made a wonderful 30-minute video entitled, 'The Nomad's Smile!' and we need to support.  It was 'shot' while he was in Mongolia (after China).  It's professionally produced (cost $12,000U.S.D.), with some profound thoughts about life.  So, please purchase for $20USD.!  His email address to order the DVD:

"alvaro biciclown"







Monday, October 17, 2011

'You cannot kill our dreams!'

A hand raised by a woman in Yemen!

www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Re: 'OCCUPY NEW ZEALAND' IS HAPPENING HERE IN AUCKLAND, ALBEIT IT SMALL, ONLY STARTED YESTERDAY. I WAS THERE TODAY!

Jan,

What is 'dying' anyway?  We lose the body, that's all.

The 'Garden of Eden' Myth symbolizes the birth of duality (ego consciousness), nee 'life and death.'

Animals lose their bodies, but they don't know that they 'die.'

Shakespeare wrote, 'Nothing is neither good nor bad, only thinking makes it so!'

Learn to think differently!

H.
www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'


On Mon, Oct 17, 2011 at 7:51 AM, J GARVERICK <janking80@msn.com> wrote:

Is there somebody we can blame for dying?? Adam and Eve???

Jan K Garverick
1615 W Cheyenne Rd #1
Colorado Springs, CO 80906
janking80@msn.com




Date: Sun, 16 Oct 2011 20:38:26 +1300
Subject: 'OCCUPY NEW ZEALAND' IS HAPPENING HERE IN AUCKLAND, ALBEIT IT SMALL, ONLY STARTED YESTERDAY. I WAS THERE TODAY!
From: creativehaqi@gmail.com
To: janking80@msn.com; ricnjan@q.com; myaslowitz@gmail.com; tobywheelerji@yahoo.com; jamur@charter.net; rajeshkhadka@hotmail.com; sarojtamang@hotmail.com; cfitzgerald@stanfordmed.org; bbryanmd@aol.com; kaldor@sbcglobal.net



www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'

Re: I can

Re:  my MacBook, making do with what you have...

I guess I was hoping for less money I could improve (Ms. Mac here) with a couple of new parts and upgrades.  Certainly, I can't afford $900U.S. on a MB 'Air.'

There's also the issue of consumerism with me (anymore)... The young want and buy new.  I don't do that any more.  I repair, and keep using.  For example, I have a jacket I wore all over China.  It's full of holes, but I keep patching it up (have learned to sew).  I could buy a new one, but I like the old one as full of memories.  My bicycle, 'Mr. Fetes,' is eleven-years old now, and was bought used.  It's not perfect for how I cycle (long distances with weight).  But, I've ridden it some 100,000KM (60,000 miles).  I'll never replace it, even though all the original paint (logo/text) have worn off the frame.

I think everyone is going to have to start thinking the same way, at least a little... The Earth is over populated, with dwindling resources.  Future generations are going to have to make do with what they have, learn to repair, and to find a way to keep 'it' going!

We've, particularly citizens of 'rich' countries, have been profligate!  We're going to have to change to survive!

H.
www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'


On Mon, Oct 17, 2011 at 3:54 AM, Marty Yaslowitz <myaslowitz@gmail.com> wrote:
Remember the cost of a refurbished new macbook is $849 and a macbook
air is $899 (at the apple web store)  so add up the costs of all the
upgrades you are proposing and the age and condition of your current
machine and see if it's worth it,
Usually memory is installed in pairs so you would want 2 two gig
memory sticks ( although I think your macbook can only use 2GB of
memory) you need to check.
third party power cables are available, check online I had to replace
mine once and the apple now was $79 and I found one for $29
You have to buy 10.6 online (I think it was $29 new) and then upgrade
to 10.6.8 using software upgrade on your Mac.
you need 10.6.8 for the new app store and the iMovie we were talking about.
I'm not sure if your machine will run Lion you need to check the Apple
website and see if you machine can, then you can only get by
purchasing at the App Store at $29
m


On Sat, Oct 15, 2011 at 2:27 PM, the 龙 <creativehaqi@gmail.com> wrote:
> Marty,
> Re:  upgrading my MacBook, now four-years old
> I went to the otherworldcomputing.com site at your suggestion... But, I
> don't feel confident installing a HD, on this MB.  There's a Chinese
> hard-soft-ware guy here, Jim (my host) uses.  Maybe Chinese guy could?  I'll
> find out, and what he charges.
> Re:  hardware
> I'm wondering if I should have Rajesh purchase/ship the following:
> 320GB HD maybe from otherworldcomputing.com
> 4GB memory chip
> power cable (probably only from Apple)
> Re:  soft ware:
> MB currently running OS X 10.5.8
> I guess I need 10.6.8, and/or 'Lion?'
> What do you think about all this?
> Thanks,
> Hutch
>
> www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'
>
>
> On Mon, Oct 10, 2011 at 12:49 PM, Martin Yaslowitz <myaslowitz@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>>
>> A little pricey.
>
>
>>
>> Fairly easy to install a HD in a MacBook. Take a look at
>> otherworldcomputing.com for drives and install instructions.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone ☮
>>
>> On Oct 9, 2011, at 5:21 PM, the 龙 <creativehaqi@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> get a 320GB HD here in Auckland for $300NZD ($225USD) installed.  A good
>> deal?  H.
>> www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'
>
>

Friday, October 14, 2011

Re: So funny...

'Brazen truth encapsulated in love!'  

Thanks for the third time tonight, Mitch!  You've made my day!  You've made my month, my year!  You've made my life by being the kind of person that understands consciousness!  Love, Hutch

On Fri, Oct 14, 2011 at 3:59 PM, MITCHELL RENNER <mitchellrenner@msn.com> wrote:

Yes, the Arthurian myth is to be the inspiration for some of my electronic music this next couple years or so, as powerful as that myth is. Hopefully I will translate it into prose in my new website as well; I am zeroing in on the URL for it... I promise this will be the place where I am confident your work, Hutch, can be placed, and have a wide impact. It is less corporate-minded, and more artistic. It is something to stand the test of time and the vagarity of cyberspace, to give people what is needed - brazen truth encapsulated in love.
 

Date: Sat, 1 Oct 2011 10:30:45 +0930

Subject: Re: So funny...
From: creativehaqi@gmail.com
To: mitchellrenner@msn.com; creativehaqi.love@blogger.com

CC: janking80@msn.com; ricnjan@q.com; myaslowitz@gmail.com; tobywheelerji@yahoo.com; jamur@charter.net; rajeshkhadka@hotmail.com; sarojtamang@hotmail.com; projectsdada@mac.com; keithalyons@gmail.com; www009pj@gmail.com; cfitzgerald@stanfordmed.org; bbryanmd@aol.com; hanknad@aol.com

Every experience is valuable!  I've done things far worse than you, Mitch!  But, 'The road of excess leads to the 'Palace of Wisdom!'  We are wiser for...

The Grail Castle myth is important, as beside the first secular myth teaching humility, learning that big lesson!  The duty of a knight (overcoming fear and anger).

When Parsifal (or whichever 'night' I forget?), was allowed back in the Grail Castle (after spending a life of learning: saving damsels in distress and slewing dragons).  When back in he noticed that someone was suffering.  So, instead of ignoring it (being oblivious to other's in pain) as he had the first time, he didn't make the same mistake twice.  He inquired of the suffering person, 'What ails thee, Uncle?'

On Sat, Oct 1, 2011 at 10:20 AM, MITCHELL RENNER <mitchellrenner@msn.com> wrote:

Good advice!

Overcoming the 'I' involves 'knowing thyself', all the strengths and weaknesses, being aware.

Sometimes we grow to comfortable with our weaknesses and let them sometimes get the best of us.

It made me think of what is 'reason' and what is 'excuse'. My intention was partly to explain that I was literally 'braindead' early this week due to an encounter over the weekend, which I'm not really proud of and won't get into the details of, other than to say I was lying face down in the gutter at 4 am in urban Chicago, unsure of where my friend's apartment was, a Kafka-esque nightmare of my own making. Every reason is an excuse for mistakes made, and every excuse is also a reason. The only difference being intention. The important thing is that we are open to questioning our own motivations. But there is also the matter of how far one is willing to go with such self-interrogation. Few are willing to attempt to strip the ego bare of all conditioning, arriving at some understanding of 'emptiness'. Along such lines, there is the work 'Myth of Sisyphus' by Albert Camus, who summarizes life's experience as the ultimate 'absurdity' of existence, written during the early years of World War II. In an offhand way, it tries to justify or excuse the behavior of millions of people slaughtering each other on the battlefield.

This moment of clarity, where the mind is devoid of unconscious impulse, does not happen suddenly. I like to think that it arrives in steady waves, flashes, like the tide coming in, for those who dare to wade further out from the safe shores of familiarity. Each new, larger, surmounting crest of awakening presents its own set of new challenges that the ego tries to adjust to and assert stability against. The ego cannot be let go of completely, in one sudden moment; it would lead to psychosis for the unprepared, which includes me. Is this an excuse? No, we are not judged ultimately by one act or another, although each act contributes to our own suffering or enlightenment. 'Judged' is not the best word, anyway; there is no judgment, only consequences.

I thought about how the most celebrated icons of humanity were all too human, and also succumbed to the worst of their own temptations. Extremists use the fallibility of humankind to justify harsh measures of controlling individuals and society. Of course we must reprove our basest instincts and our worst behavior, just as we should celebrate our greatest efforts and transcending acts against impulsive nature. We cannot expect change without the ability to scrutinize and accept criticism, nor without putting effort into our lifelong goals and dreams. The carrot or the stick? One of the oldest metaphors in the book. At some point, we need neither, if we are fortunate to be so wise.

It also reminds me of a comment by John Cage, that every single thing that was put into a work 'mattered'. This coming from a man who at the same time suggested his work was 'meaningless'. Therein lies the koan of perceptible reality. The question is, what do we do with the time we are given, which I laugh to say, was uttered by Tolkien's wizard character Gandalf in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. But beyond this, what do we see, in what we have done.

Carelessness in some cases is inexcusable; we expect ourselves to rise above our conditions, and accept certain responsibilities in life. To some artists, responsibilities can seem like the walls of a prison cell. We must ask ourselves what we are responsible for, and work together to come to some mutual agreements, as to how life should be ordered and, in turn, disordered. Too much freedom in the same sense can serve as one's own prison.

Please excuse my philosophical banter and recklessness. I wish to destroy the walls of unconsciousness and open the mind to limitless possibility. In the process, sometimes like Icarus, I get to close to the flickering flames of warm temptation. Our fabricated wax wings melt away we fall to the ground and die a little bit. And then we're placed back into the maze, seeking a way 'out', only, a little bit wiser the next time.

The psychological disconnect of our understanding of nature and our failure to do so, is the maze of our making. In fury of not being able to figure out some way out, sometimes we fall back on the same paths we once walked before, exulting in our own sense of security in familiarization, only to realize later, the same traps that had been set are still there, about to apprehend us. How much of this maze have we explored? How much is enough? It isn't just a maze of barren walls and tunnels, but a maze of every single living experience that can be known. It's quite capable for a human being to be satisfied with just a simple set of experiences, and grow like a vine along those narrowly limited reaches, ever content in following the rays of the sun in some small corner of existence. I have no qualms for such. I merely question those who say 'this way is clear' when it is clearly 'trapped', those who seek to lead others down into the depths of some hellish experience. At some point I must learn to let go, but moreso, as Hutch teaches, 'to teach'. I may not know the way out, but I know of a greater expanse of freedom that can be attained.

At some point, I ask myself, do I want this for myself, simply, or do I acknowledge others, that we are all one and the same? The Theravadan and Mayahana Buddhists seem to disagree on this point, fundamentally. One waits to help others out into the sea, to presumably reach the 'other shore'; the other goes there alone. Is the Theravadan's path just 'romantic' love?

We continue wandering in that primeval forest, looking for new paths, vistas, experiences, until the place where we must give up, only to one day, return again: Nietzsche's 'eternal recurrence', and the Buddha's 'wheel of existence', or 'samsara'.

Mitch


Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 07:04:37 +0930
Subject: Re: So funny...
From: creativehaqi@gmail.com
To: creativehaqi.love@blogger.com; mitchellrenner@msn.com
CC: janking80@msn.com; ricnjan@q.com; myaslowitz@gmail.com; tobywheelerji@yahoo.com; jamur@charter.net; rajeshkhadka@hotmail.com; sarojtamang@hotmail.com; projectsdada@mac.com; keithalyons@gmail.com; www009pj@gmail.com; cfitzgerald@stanfordmed.org; bbryanmd@aol.com; hanknad@aol.com

What does 'sleepy' have to do with 'Reuters' and 'AP?'   A stretch by any imagination.... Does 'sleepy,' take your cognition away?  Why make some excuse?

I find when I fuck up (which is often), it's just better to come clean and admit, thus I say, 'Sorry, I fucked up!  Teach me!'  Or, an apology might be in order.  

All the time in my life now, I find myself apologizing... Why?  Because I finally realize how 'fucked up I' really am...   But, the 'I' 'I' call 'I,' is not the 'I!' 

The goal... Getting beyond the 'I!' 

And what about love...?  Not romantic love, but the kind without an object of desire.

H.

On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 3:53 AM, MITCHELL RENNER <mitchellrenner@msn.com> wrote:

Oops, I feel embarrassed. Nope, Richard, AP isn't owned by Reuters. I was pretty sleepy last night. Thanks for the catch.


Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2011 15:33:11 +0930
Subject: Re: So funny...CC: janking80@msn.com; ricnjan@q.com; myaslowitz@gmail.com; tobywheelerji@yahoo.com; jamur@charter.net; rajeshkhadka@hotmail.com; sarojtamang@hotmail.com; projectsdada@mac.com; keithalyons@gmail.com; www009pj@gmail.com; cfitzgerald@stanfordmed.org; bbryanmd@aol.com; hanknad@aol.com


Corpos. anymore, not countries.  The corpos., control the politicians that do the 'dirty work.'  

H.

On Wed, Sep 28, 2011 at 1:19 PM, MITCHELL RENNER <mitchellrenner@msn.com> wrote:
Reuters also owns AP...
 
I've heard that the Rothschild family 'controls' Reuters but I've never followed up on that claim.

Wouldn't surprise me. If you can't beat them... buy them out.




Re: Great Letter

Wow II!  Mitch, thanks again!

What is unique about American culture?  The talent to create, to innovate, to think 'out of the box!'

I used to draw something on my white board in our office in China (for my Chinese 'sons and daughters'):  I would draw a small box saying, 'This is where you think.'  Then, I would draw a large circle around the box saying, 'This is where I think!  Learn to think out here (indicating the large circle!'  It's the one thing Americans have that no other culture has, the ability to think 'out of the box!' 

So, why can't we think ourselves out of our problems?

H.

2011/10/14
One should have nothing against human cultivation when it allows the input of the widsom of diversity of nature.
Bruce, that is wonderful what you have done. I have said before, on one fine evening, that if I had untold millions, I would buy up portions of the Illinois River to preserve as sanctuary. Not to be 'green', but to serve as a resource for humans, and their respect for nature. I do not subscribe to the model of chemical agriculture on the industrial scale.
One can ask, 'What have you done?' I do not buy conventional food products, and I have been involved with local food co-ops and have taken a classes in organic farming, horticulture, etc. When people ask me my goals in life, the main goal is to be successful as a musician and writer, and use the profit I make to start an organic - moreso holistic - food business in Illinois, a la Paul Newman, or in the vein of Amy's Kitchen products. What could be better than providing safe and wholesome food to people, providing decent jobs (with 'physical' and healthy labor), a local heritage, for how we should be stewards of the land?
People argue that we could not feed the world on organic food - it takes up too much land. My answer is, we can't afford not to. ('Organic' being the label for not using chemicals - it's more than that; one must also preserve the nutrients in the soil that provides trace elements in one's diet.)

That is my dream - and one I will die fighting for - that we subvert/convert the corporations and their political minions into a submission that recognizes wisdom and compassion, else they destroy our genetic diversity to the point of destitution.
It's very clear, and one shouldn't be, I think, distracted by the 'global warming' activists, simply because, that is a movement that has been co-opted by the elites to gain ownership. I'm not saying it is or isn't a threat, but I am wary of bleeding-heart mentalities for good reason - it's the same kind of unconsciousness that exists in conservative quarters.
The fact is, we should strive for efficiency and diversity in all areas of human cultivation, whether it be energy, food, health, the arts, education, etc. I'm finding the equation. It isn't God or enlightenment or anything. It is freedom to love, play, and be creative, to share, and have a structure in society for the justice of knowledge of nature to build as craftsmen and craftswomen. All of us have talents to give in our local habitats, whether we are machinists, storytellers, farmers, builders, philosophers, artists, athletes, rhetoricians, poets, designers, fixers, tradespeople, etc. We must allow the diversity of our own ingenuity to be happy, and we must allow the necessity of nature without stupid control mechanisms to help us live healthy, productive, blissful lives, since all things are connected.

Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2011 16:13:04 +1030
Subject: Re: Great Letter
From: creativehaqi@gmail.com
To: bbryanmd@aol.com


Great!  Good for you and the Bryan family!

If negative (in terms of your 'carbon footprint'), you're ahead of most!  You may be ahead of me, as I never have planted a forest, and also drove a motor vehicle many miles in the U.S. (pre bicycle).

I'll definitely camp out on your property!  In fact, I will do 'puja' (spiritual offering) there, for the Bryan family!

Hutch
www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'


On Wed, Oct 5, 2011 at 3:51 PM, Bruce Bryan <bbryanmd@aol.com> wrote:

Well you can camp at the Bryan Family forest, we planted it a few years ago.... we did a bigger one further north, Tauranga, ...I DID SOMETHING about Global CO2 levels.....before all the hype...we were dealing with it our own carbon footprint....I think for my lifetime I may negative...!


On Oct 4, 2011, at 9:55 PM, the 龙 wrote:

Thanks.  I plan to go north (in two weeks) to the very tip, and then, slowly, back down all the way to the tip of South Island.

Sounds like you've been everywhere, even some obscure places in N.Z!  But, I have a feeling this is your or some friend's property (the place you've directed me to)?  

But, you should know by now I camp out, 'rooms' too expensive for me.  I just camped out in the Dignam's backyard for two weeks (in the rain).  Now, inside Jim Berger's house (in a regular bed), I don't like so much.  Too warm, too much comfort... 

Greetings to all there in Lijiang, by the way.  I communicated with Bob when he was in Australia, maybe still...?

Hutch

P.S.  In two days, with little exposure to all of N.Z., I can see why people would want to live here:  a multi-cultural population that gets along (integrated), scenic beauty, clean air (basically), and enough of whatever... But, too expensive for me.

www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'


On Wed, Oct 5, 2011 at 3:10 PM, Bruce Bryan <bbryanmd@aol.com> wrote:
Dear Hutch,
If you head up the east coast, go to Whangarei, take the coastal road to Matapouri make a left at the school field, go up the road along the mangrove stream, turn left at the first road, you should see a forest on your left above Matapouri, the road will be overgrown and take you over a bridge...there is a sign and a fence...you will recognize the sign.  Have a look around from the top of the hill.

You will also enjoy the restaurants at Tutukaka Harbor a bit before Matapouri and the Paradise Rendevous may be able to give you a nice room overlooking the Poor Knights Islands.

Go North to Kerikeri, Opua, and then Russell, then if you go further north let me now...you can go see another deep water harbour with beautiful beaches and inexpensive accomodation.

Best wishes,


B


On Oct 4, 2011, at 9:26 PM, the 龙 wrote:

Hutch from Auckland, N.Z.

www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'


2011/10/5 Bruce Bryan MD <bbryanmd@aol.com>
Dear Mitch
Great thoughts thank you for writing
B

Sent from my iPod

On Oct 5, 2011, at 11:20 AM, the 龙 <creativehaqi@gmail.com> wrote:

Thanks so much for the Camus quote, Mitch!  How true what he writes...

But, what is 'love,' anyway...?  Desire?  No not the 'real' kind.   'Sex,' for sure not!  Real 'love,' is giving without ever conceiving of receiving, maybe a version of Camus' 'admiring.'   You 'admire' (appreciate) something so much you want to share with it (both ways).

You are, Mitch, one I wouldn't want to lose (while I have a body).  So, hang around and keep educating me and others!

Love,
Hutch
now in New Zealand
www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'


On Wed, Oct 5, 2011 at 11:14 AM, MITCHELL RENNER <mitchellrenner@msn.com> wrote:

夏天昆虫尝试描述冰
Yet, we are 'Nature', as well... and nature thus becomes 'divorced' from itself. As you've remarked, Adam and Eve, tasting forbidden fruit in the garden of divinity, 'consciousness' awaking to itself and its own power to manipulate what it perceives.

Camus wrote in 1952, '...I watched the sea barely swelling at that hour with an exhausted motion, and I satisfied the two thirsts one cannot long neglect without drying up - I mean loving and admiring. For there is merely bad luck in not being loved; there is misfortune in not loving. All of us, today, are dying of this misfortune. For violence and hatred dry up the heart itself; the long fight for justice exhausts the love that nevertheless gave birth to it. In the clamor in which we live, love is impossible and justice does not suffice.'

Love is the banner of justice!


Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2011 11:47:18 +0930
Subject: BIGGEST PROBLEM IN THE WORLD TODAY:
From: creativehaqi@gmail.com
To: mitchellrenner@msn.com; janking80@msn.com; ricnjan@q.com; myaslowitz@gmail.com; tobywheelerji@yahoo.com; jamur@charter.net; rajeshkhadka@hotmail.com; sarojtamang@hotmail.com; projectsdada@mac.com; keithalyons@gmail.com; cfitzgerald@stanfordmed.org; www009pj@gmail.com; m.dwyer6@gmail.com; bbryanmd@aol.com; hanknad@aol.com


Man interfering with Nature!

Simple!

We think we're God!  Ah BIG NEWS, we're 'knot!' 

What's happening in the world today is the Tao trying to balance a very-out-of-balance world!  Humanity, doing the unbalancing!


H.







Thursday, October 13, 2011

Re: Who knows what this is about, the AIC could be involved... You can't trust the media for the truth...

Thanks Mitch!  Keep up the brilliant writing that dares to offend, when the rest of us too afraid to speak up!

America, is truly a nation of sheep, and thus we get what we deserve!

Hutch

P.S.  I've added some paragraphs, maybe to make a little easier to read.  Maybe Peter S., might correct mine?

On Fri, Oct 14, 2011 at 2:23 PM, MITCHELL RENNER <mitchellrenner@msn.com> wrote:

This is such a new twist on modern society: that fabricated geopolitical plots could be used so blatantly as tools to push worldwide agendas.
 
I mean, Goebbels as the minister of propaganda for the Riech prior to World War II was the master, but in retrospect, that was so obvious in its localized element of the German putsch. Now, as the plots ratchet up once again, we are forced to witness in total confusion what any of this means. In a just society, the vetting of testimony in an honorable court of law would seek truth; now, what do we have? Guilt through assumption, or else such wavering of storylines concocted by insider media that it becomes much the same as a bad Hollywood movie plot on empirical steroids.
 
We cannot deny that the American establishment and anyone else willing to go along with it has sought global domination. What is this about? Control of natural resources and enrichment through the muscle of military to ensure corporate contracts over local worldwide dominions? Are we not living in the age of yet another phase of colonialism, where those who stand up independently to the world's oligarchies, are forced to play their hands?
 
Is this just a replay of the conquests of old, a la the Mongols, who swept in and through the use of force and deception brought local factions to their knees in submission to the overlord who then takes his tribute in the building of empire? With the white men in suits holding the puppeteer strings? Is this just the way of nature, the strong assimilating the weak? Will it then lead to the benign philsopher king, once the limits have been reached, as culture homogenizes under the auspices of a 'new world order' that brings people together under the force of tyranny paying tribute to the masters?
 
Do the players even realize the game they are playing, that there could be another way, or are most of them - the minions - so wrapped up in the nuances, the breathtaking occurrences of nature found in any pursuit that we can delve into and pique our interest in no matter what the subject or object involved, that they merely accept what is status quo?
 
What are the rewards at the end of the day for the conquistadors? What pleasures do they count on, once their work has been done? Perhaps they assume that the human race has not advanced in consciousness enough, to not respond to anything but the presence of a brute force. And that they are deserving of some poor wretched fate if they can believe in the nonsense that is touted about in the schemes being put forth almost as a form of bait, gloatingly, for those who could disbelieve it. Pity to those who suffer in those raids and conquests and those who die randomly in the crossfire of international profiteering.  Those at home who are forced to join the efforts of supporting the crusade when there is so much more to live for than being a cog in some pig-headed regime.
 
I see it as a goal of mine to point out all the flaws in such a system of governance and powerplay that feeds on its own ignorance, thus perpetuating discognizance. People are so believing of everything they hear, I almost have to admire the bravado of the trickster who deceives them; they have forced the hand of nature to decide the outcome, but it is stupid to throw your fellow human into the trash heap of history as they continue to do.
 
If a man or woman decides to live in ignorance despite being given ample opportunities to realize their own faults, it is one thing; it is another to willfully deceive another and deny others such opportunities to better themselves and share in the wealth of living a noble life: that damns the instigator and holder of such knowledge and the fate of their so-called 'conquest'.
 
Since I've become accustomed to this in the last year or so - the hijinks of the powerful - I've grown callous to the tired refrains emitting from all angles of deniability. I recognize the straights we find ourselves in and the traps of the individual reactionary mindset. We all have our own battles to be fought and it is ultimately a respect for the fellow human that wins the day, that allows the light of the sun to shine forth in darkest corners by bequeathing one's own taming of the ego and becoming translucent to the nature beholden to us.
 
Glory not to the man or woman who steals the light for oneself but to those who act as a focus for the light to shine upon others in recognition of what each has to offer to the cause of each to their own enrichment, as a whole. Why steal, when you can give? Why be lured by the siren song, or go barrelling against marauding windmills of the mind, when it is but an illusion of fancy that one is merely chasing after? It is better to sit and revile in the beauty of some lone flower than to pick it and proclaim some domination in the name of beauty.
 
And so it goes, as Billy Joel once sang... that I can write but not live the essence of what I mean. But every proclamation is a start, because the emperor's new clothes always reveal what is truly there, at some points, as one parades around in the attire so prominently displayed.


Date: Thu, 13 Oct 2011 20:16:34 +1300
Subject: Who knows what this is about, the AIC could be involved... You can't trust the media for the truth...
From: creativehaqi@gmail.com
To: mitchellrenner@msn.com; janking80@msn.com; ricnjan@q.com; myaslowitz@gmail.com; tobywheelerji@yahoo.com; jamur@charter.net; rajeshkhadka@hotmail.com; sarojtamang@hotmail.com; kaldor@sbcglobal.net; bbryanmd@aol.com


 Unlikely Turn for a Suspect in a Terror Plot

By ROBERT F. WORTH and LAURA TILLMAN

Mansour J. Arbabsiar, suspected in an alleged Iranian plot to kill a Saudi diplomat in Washington, seems to have been more a stumbling opportunist than a calculating killer.

www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'

RE: So funny...

Yes, the Arthurian myth is to be the inspiration for some of my electronic music this next couple years or so, as powerful as that myth is. Hopefully I will translate it into prose in my new website as well; I am zeroing in on the URL for it... I promise this will be the place where I am confident your work, Hutch, can be placed, and have a wide impact. It is less corporate-minded, and more artistic. It is something to stand the test of time and the vagarity of cyberspace, to give people what is needed - brazen truth encapsulated in love.


Date: Sat, 1 Oct 2011 10:30:45 +0930
Subject: Re: So funny...
From: creativehaqi@gmail.com
To: creativehaqi.love@blogger.com
CC: janking80@msn.com; ricnjan@q.com; myaslowitz@gmail.com; tobywheelerji@yahoo.com; jamur@charter.net; rajeshkhadka@hotmail.com; sarojtamang@hotmail.com; projectsdada@mac.com; keithalyons@gmail.com; www009pj@gmail.com; cfitzgerald@stanfordmed.org; bbryanmd@aol.com; hanknad@aol.com

Every experience is valuable!  I've done things far worse than you, Mitch!  But, 'The road of excess leads to the 'Palace of Wisdom!'  We are wiser for...

The Grail Castle myth is important, as beside the first secular myth teaching humility, learning that big lesson!  The duty of a knight (overcoming fear and anger).

When Parsifal (or whichever 'night' I forget?), was allowed back in the Grail Castle (after spending a life of learning: saving damsels in distress and slewing dragons).  When back in he noticed that someone was suffering.  So, instead of ignoring it (being oblivious to other's in pain) as he had the first time, he didn't make the same mistake twice.  He inquired of the suffering person, 'What ails thee, Uncle?'

Good advice!

Overcoming the 'I' involves 'knowing thyself', all the strengths and weaknesses, being aware.

Sometimes we grow to comfortable with our weaknesses and let them sometimes get the best of us.

It made me think of what is 'reason' and what is 'excuse'. My intention was partly to explain that I was literally 'braindead' early this week due to an encounter over the weekend, which I'm not really proud of and won't get into the details of, other than to say I was lying face down in the gutter at 4 am in urban Chicago, unsure of where my friend's apartment was, a Kafka-esque nightmare of my own making. Every reason is an excuse for mistakes made, and every excuse is also a reason. The only difference being intention. The important thing is that we are open to questioning our own motivations. But there is also the matter of how far one is willing to go with such self-interrogation. Few are willing to attempt to strip the ego bare of all conditioning, arriving at some understanding of 'emptiness'. Along such lines, there is the work 'Myth of Sisyphus' by Albert Camus, who summarizes life's experience as the ultimate 'absurdity' of existence, written during the early years of World War II. In an offhand way, it tries to justify or excuse the behavior of millions of people slaughtering each other on the battlefield.

This moment of clarity, where the mind is devoid of unconscious impulse, does not happen suddenly. I like to think that it arrives in steady waves, flashes, like the tide coming in, for those who dare to wade further out from the safe shores of familiarity. Each new, larger, surmounting crest of awakening presents its own set of new challenges that the ego tries to adjust to and assert stability against. The ego cannot be let go of completely, in one sudden moment; it would lead to psychosis for the unprepared, which includes me. Is this an excuse? No, we are not judged ultimately by one act or another, although each act contributes to our own suffering or enlightenment. 'Judged' is not the best word, anyway; there is no judgment, only consequences.

I thought about how the most celebrated icons of humanity were all too human, and also succumbed to the worst of their own temptations. Extremists use the fallibility of humankind to justify harsh measures of controlling individuals and society. Of course we must reprove our basest instincts and our worst behavior, just as we should celebrate our greatest efforts and transcending acts against impulsive nature. We cannot expect change without the ability to scrutinize and accept criticism, nor without putting effort into our lifelong goals and dreams. The carrot or the stick? One of the oldest metaphors in the book. At some point, we need neither, if we are fortunate to be so wise.

It also reminds me of a comment by John Cage, that every single thing that was put into a work 'mattered'. This coming from a man who at the same time suggested his work was 'meaningless'. Therein lies the koan of perceptible reality. The question is, what do we do with the time we are given, which I laugh to say, was uttered by Tolkien's wizard character Gandalf in the Lord of the Rings trilogy. But beyond this, what do we see, in what we have done.

Carelessness in some cases is inexcusable; we expect ourselves to rise above our conditions, and accept certain responsibilities in life. To some artists, responsibilities can seem like the walls of a prison cell. We must ask ourselves what we are responsible for, and work together to come to some mutual agreements, as to how life should be ordered and, in turn, disordered. Too much freedom in the same sense can serve as one's own prison.

Please excuse my philosophical banter and recklessness. I wish to destroy the walls of unconsciousness and open the mind to limitless possibility. In the process, sometimes like Icarus, I get to close to the flickering flames of warm temptation. Our fabricated wax wings melt away we fall to the ground and die a little bit. And then we're placed back into the maze, seeking a way 'out', only, a little bit wiser the next time.

The psychological disconnect of our understanding of nature and our failure to do so, is the maze of our making. In fury of not being able to figure out some way out, sometimes we fall back on the same paths we once walked before, exulting in our own sense of security in familiarization, only to realize later, the same traps that had been set are still there, about to apprehend us. How much of this maze have we explored? How much is enough? It isn't just a maze of barren walls and tunnels, but a maze of every single living experience that can be known. It's quite capable for a human being to be satisfied with just a simple set of experiences, and grow like a vine along those narrowly limited reaches, ever content in following the rays of the sun in some small corner of existence. I have no qualms for such. I merely question those who say 'this way is clear' when it is clearly 'trapped', those who seek to lead others down into the depths of some hellish experience. At some point I must learn to let go, but moreso, as Hutch teaches, 'to teach'. I may not know the way out, but I know of a greater expanse of freedom that can be attained.

At some point, I ask myself, do I want this for myself, simply, or do I acknowledge others, that we are all one and the same? The Theravadan and Mayahana Buddhists seem to disagree on this point, fundamentally. One waits to help others out into the sea, to presumably reach the 'other shore'; the other goes there alone. Is the Theravadan's path just 'romantic' love?

We continue wandering in that primeval forest, looking for new paths, vistas, experiences, until the place where we must give up, only to one day, return again: Nietzsche's 'eternal recurrence', and the Buddha's 'wheel of existence', or 'samsara'.

Mitch


Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2011 07:04:37 +0930
Subject: Re: So funny...
From: creativehaqi@gmail.com
To: creativehaqi.love@blogger.com;
CC: janking80@msn.com; ricnjan@q.com; myaslowitz@gmail.com; tobywheelerji@yahoo.com; jamur@charter.net; rajeshkhadka@hotmail.com; sarojtamang@hotmail.com; projectsdada@mac.com; keithalyons@gmail.com; www009pj@gmail.com; cfitzgerald@stanfordmed.org; bbryanmd@aol.com; hanknad@aol.com

What does 'sleepy' have to do with 'Reuters' and 'AP?'   A stretch by any imagination.... Does 'sleepy,' take your cognition away?  Why make some excuse?

I find when I fuck up (which is often), it's just better to come clean and admit, thus I say, 'Sorry, I fucked up!  Teach me!'  Or, an apology might be in order.  

All the time in my life now, I find myself apologizing... Why?  Because I finally realize how 'fucked up I' really am...   But, the 'I' 'I' call 'I,' is not the 'I!' 

The goal... Getting beyond the 'I!' 

And what about love...?  Not romantic love, but the kind without an object of desire.

H.
            Oops, I feel embarrassed. Nope, Richard, AP isn't owned by Reuters. I was pretty sleepy last    
night. Thanks for the catch.

Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2011 15:33:11 +0930
Subject: Re: So funny...
CC: janking80@msn.com; ricnjan@q.com; myaslowitz@gmail.com; tobywheelerji@yahoo.com; jamur@charter.net; rajeshkhadka@hotmail.com; sarojtamang@hotmail.com; projectsdada@mac.com; keithalyons@gmail.com; www009pj@gmail.com; cfitzgerald@stanfordmed.org; bbryanmd@aol.com; hanknad@aol.com


Corpos. anymore, not countries.  The corpos., control the politicians that do the 'dirty work.'

H.

On Wed, Sep 28, 2011 at 1:19 PM, MITCHELL RENNER <mitchellrenner@msn.com> wrote:
Reuters also owns AP...

I've heard that the Rothschild family 'controls' Reuters but I've never followed up on that claim.

Wouldn't surprise me. If you can't beat them... buy them out.



Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Here's the history of the problem: corporations as 'legal persons!' All of this needs to be repealed!

Dissent In Paris Sparked Creation Of The Corporate Person

Posted: 10/12/11 02:18 PM ET












WASHINGTON -- Of all the Occupy Wall Street refrains, one of the most memorable is, "I refuse to believe that corporations are people until Texas executes one." But, clever as it is, the quip looks to the wrong end of the life cycle: The only thing more corrupt than the legal concept of corporate personhood is the way a Gilded Age judge birthed it.

The discontented have been occupying the streets for a long time. But the convulsions with which the ruling class in America reacted to the Paris Commune of 1871 make Fox News' coverage of Occupy Wall Street sound fawning.

The Paris Commune was the first international incident followed daily in the United States. While President Barack Obama complains about the 24-hour news cycle today, its roots stretch back to Cyrus Field's transcontinental telegraph cable, which allowed the elites of America to focus intently on the two-month uprising and ultimate slaughter of thousands of Parisians. Cyrus Field's brother and his family were in Paris at the time, and a third brother, Supreme Court Justice Stephen Field, obsessively tracked the news back in the states. It was the Paris uprising that transformed Stephen Field from a mundanely corrupt judge in the paid service of the railroads to a zealous crusader for all corporations, with the aim of suppressing what he and other leaders saw as the threat of democracy from below.

For much of the first U.S. century, it was an accepted fact that the people, through their legislators, had the power to pass laws that businesses were required to obey. After the Civil War, Reconstruction-era statutes and constitutional amendments -- particularly the 14th Amendment -- strictly limited the ability of legislators to restrict the rights of the recently freed African Americans.

In a historic irony, it was the protections contained in those Reconstruction laws that corporations sought to grab for their own. Justice Field was the hand they used.

The common understanding of how the corporation became a legal person says that a Supreme Court reporter of decisions erroneously said as much in a case summary and that error became an unremovable stain, coloring every decision after. But that reading of history whitewashes what was, in fact, a coordinated effort to win citizenship for corporations.

The idea of corporate personhood was once viewed as nonsense. A corporation was formed to limit the financial liability of its owners in pursuing their business: If the corporation went broke, debtors couldn't come after its owners. That such a company might also have all the rights of citizens was a concept on the fringes. Yet by force of judicial will, Field pulled it right into the mainstream.

He began with his dissenting opinion in the 1873 Slaughter-House cases, decided by the Supreme Court on a 5-4 vote. Writing for the minority, Field asserted that the freedom of a corporation to pursue its business interests was "the distinguishing privilege of all citizens of the United States."

The Louisiana Legislature, then controlled by a majority coalition of African Americans and white Reconstructionists known as "Radical Republicans," had passed a law insisting that all butchers move their business south of New Orleans, so the butchers' entrails didn't pollute the city's water supply. The Court upheld the law, and the city's pattern of repeated cholera outbreaks stopped cold. Field argued, however, that it was a corporation's God-given right to dump pig intestines wherever it saw fit, regardless of the public health consequences or laws on the books.

Field was as much concerned with protecting business investments as he was with working the Lord's will. He was heavily invested in railroads and other industries that came before the Court, so much so that the chief justice at the time pressed him not to weigh in on certain cases. "There was no doubt of your intimate personal relations with the managers of the Central Pacific, and it would tend to discredit the opinion if it came from someone known as the personal friend of the parties representing these railroad interests," the chief justice warned Field, according to Jack Beatty's "Age of Betrayal: The Triumph of Money in America, 1865-1900."

Field didn't have the votes of his high court colleagues to directly insert corporate personhood into law, so he exploited another aspect of the Reconstruction-era legal system to work the railroads' will. Congress had forbidden the Court from reviewing certain cases, (presciently) concerned that the justices would undermine the work legislators was doing, even the new constitutional amendments. As a compromise, Congress allowed justices to continue to sit occasionally on the circuit courts. When sitting on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in California, Field repeatedly wrote into his decisions that corporations were persons. Those decisions became precedents in the 9th Circuit, but nowhere else.

In a dispute over taxation of the Southern Pacific Railroad Co., Field cited his own "Ninth Circuit law" to declare that the "defendant, being a corporation, a person within the meaning of the 14th Amendment," is "entitled, with respect to its property, to equal protection of the laws." San Mateo County appealed to the Supreme Court, but the case dragged on. (Following oral arguments in Washington, Field adjourned with the railroad's lawyers to a dinner party thrown by railroad tycoon Leland Stanford, a close friend of Field's who had previously appointed him to run the school Stanford set up in his son's name.) In desperate need of the taxes the railroad refused to pay -- citing its freedom to do business under the same protections granted any other citizen -- the county settled with the company.

The settlement ended the Supreme Court case and denied Field one chance to enshrine personhood into law, but he was soon given another. In 1886, Santa Clara County sued Southern Pacific Railroad in a similar case, and the company again asserted its personhood. In fact, whether Southern Pacific was a citizen was irrelevant to the particular dispute, which was decided on technical issues of tax law that applied equally to a business or a person. But the Court reporter, John Chandler Bancroft Davis, who was himself financially intertwined with the railroads, wrote the following in his summary of the decision: "The defendant Corporations are persons within the intent of the clause in section I of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which forbids a state to deny to any person equal protection of the laws."

Nothing like that was contained in Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad Co. itself, so where did Davis get such language? The most likely answer lies with Field, who made a habit of micromanaging Davis' summaries. And Davis himself had plenty of reason to play along: In an earlier case that came before the Court, Davis had been accused of acting as an attorney and trustee of a railroad company, only to wind up with much of that company's assets in his own hands.

As merely part of a reporter's summary, Davis' statement of corporate personhood carried no legal weight. But in a 1888 decision, Field enshrined the error. Citing the Santa Clara case, he wrote, completely out of the blue and not in reaction to any facts in the new case, that a "private corporation is included under the designation of 'person' in the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, Section I." That a corporation was a person had -- presto -- become settled law.

More than a century later, in the 5-4 decision of Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Chief Justice John Roberts would rely on this nonsensical and corrupt ruling to enshrine into law the equally perverse notion that a corporation is a person entitled to all the liberties of the First Amendment and therefore, in another leap of logic, free to spend as much of its money as it pleases to influence elections, regardless of any laws passed to the contrary.

But it didn't take a century for Field's coup to begin influencing public policy. Even before the Santa Clara case, corporations were asserting that a God-given "liberty to contract" allowed them to ignore laws regulating the workplace. When legendary labor leader Samuel Gompers persuaded New York to ban the making of cigars in tenement sweatshops, the Supreme Court overturned the law in a landmark 1885 ruling, In re Jacobs, saying it violated the cigar makers' freedom. A similar 1899 case struck down a law granting an eight-hour workday to employees of city contractors, and the majority specifically cited Field's original dissent in the Slaughter-House cases.

In short, corporations did not become citizens by accident. It took roughly a decade to usurp the liberty given to freed slaves and apply it instead to businesses.

Field's complete vision, fortunately, has not yet come to pass. The principle of "liberty of contract," despite libertarian efforts over the last two decades, has not been brought back in from the cold where the New Deal Court banished it over 70 years ago. Corporations still cannot vote even if they may now spend infinite amounts of money to influence an election. And the Second Amendment, which so far protects only the individual right to keep loaded handguns in the home for self-defense, does not give corporations the right to stockpile weapons in the workplace in case actual "class warfare" breaks out.

Nor, crucially, do corporations enjoy the Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination. Such a privilege, the Supreme Court has long held, "is essentially a personal one, applying only to natural individuals." And the Fourth Amendment's ban on unreasonable searches and seizures "at the most guards against abuse only by way of too much indefiniteness or breadth," according to a 1946 Supreme Court decision. Corporations and their officers, then, can be subpoenaed to produce their records and papers without running afoul of the Fourth Amendment and cannot invoke the Fifth Amendment to escape such a court order.

But for these gaps in corporate personhood to be even small comfort in our new Gilded Age, one of those bad-acting "artificial persons" must first be charged with a crime. That's something rarely seen in today's era of corporate unaccountability, thanks largely to the influence of business over politics -- the legacy, in a twisted way, of the Paris Commune.

www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

And we complain about other nation's...

Is the U.S. Just?

In many American prisons, the treatment of prisoners is a national disgrace. Numerous reports have documented widespread prisoner abuse, prison rape, medical neglect and severe overcrowding. In recent weeks, for instance, there have been a number of important articles describing abuse in the Los Angeles County Jails. Here's a sampling of headlines from the LA [...]

www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'

"Leaping antelope brings down cyclist in South Africa"

I once 'raced' a pronghorn (technically not an antelope) north of Craig, Colorado, cycling up to Montana (circa. 2003)

It was early morning, and few cars on the highway... I had camped in some little community (name?) and going north to the Wyoming border.  In this area there were high fences were on each side.

Somehow a pronghorn was inside this area, and saw me coming.  Scared, s/he raced forward trying to get away as thought I was after it.  They won't jump (or can't) over fences.  It would get way ahead (much faster), and then rest.  Then, here I would come, and it was sure I was after it.  S/he would then dash back and forth across the highway, at one time, almost hit by an oncoming automobile.  We did this for maybe one mile, until it was so exhausted it stopped 'caught' at a bridge.  But, as soon as I passed it ran the other direction.  But, what an amazing experience!  I shall never forget.

People wonder why I cycle the world... Such experiences, as you approach quietly, and surprise wildlife.  

A couple days before I had startled a couple of raccoons digging their nest.  I remember the 'clicking' sound they made as I passed by (two meters away).

Hutch
Spanning the globe to bring you the constant variety...

www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'

'If I owned both Texas and Hell, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas!' But, now you wouldn't get much $ for renting...


October 10, 2011, 2:10 pm

Life Without Texas

BASTROP, Texas

For a reality check on Governor Rick Perry's mission of minimalist government, I took a drive to Bastrop County the other day. Once rural, the county has burgeoned into an outlying Austin bedroom community, a patchwork of subdivisions plowed deep into pretty forests of loblolly pine. Formerly pretty, I should say. A summer of parching drought, the hottest and driest on record, turned those forests to tinder, and on Labor Day weekend high winds lashed a few stray sparks into the worst wildfires in Texas history. The inferno here raced across an area 20 by 30 miles, and left 1,500 families homeless.

The fires were finally tamed a couple of weeks ago, but the day I drove out from Austin for a look at the remains, a flare-up incinerated another 1,000 acres. A visibly weary road foreman for the county, Andy Baker, took me around some of the devastation.

"I still can't believe it, and I've been dealing with it over a month," he said as we wove through a development called Tahitian Village, along roads with names intended to convey a tropical paradise: Mauna Loa, Akaloa, Kipahulu. We passed house after house burnt down to stubble, thickets of blackened pine spindles, husks of incinerated cars and the occasional charred swing set or septic tank.

Here and there, a house had been spared, a dubious mercy: the good news is, you still have a house. The bad news is, it's all by itself in a vast ashtray.

Shortly before my visit, President Obama, without naming Bastrop, singled it out as a symptom of the Republican Party's continuing war on reality.  "You've got a governor whose state is on fire denying climate change," he told supporters at a fundraiser. The Perry campaign retorted that the president was playing politics with tragedy. But it's hard to disentangle this tragedy from politics.

No climate scientist would claim a direct relationship between global warming and this or any other individual attack of extreme weather. But most would say confidently that the global trends tipped the odds towards disaster.

"We can't say climate change is causing the extreme weather Texas is having right now," Andrew Dessler, professor of atmospheric sciences at Perry's alma mater, Texas A and M,  told John Burnett of NPR. "On the other hand, we can say humans have increased the temperature of the base climate state pretty much everywhere. And what that means is it makes the heat more extreme and increases evaporation form the soil. We can be confident we've made this hellish summer worse than it would have been."

The Texas State climatologist, John Nielsen-Gammon, another A and M professor who is effectively Perry's adviser on such matters, has said much the same. Asked by a reporter whether he had made his views known to the governor, Nielsen-Gammon said he had never been asked.

Actually there is a more immediately consequential link between the hands-off state and the ruins in Bastrop County.

Everywhere Andy Baker took me, you saw the soot-blackened foundations nestled right up against the brush that turned to kindling – no buffer zones, none of what planners call "defensible space." It turns out the Texas legislature has never given county governments any authority over land use. According to the National Association of Counties, it is one of only three states where counties don't have zoning power.

"We can educate, and education needs to go on," said Ronnie McDonald, the highest county executive. "But at the end of the day, it's an individual choice." With, needless to day, consequences for everyone else.

Andrew Revkin, a science reporter who writes our Dot Earth blog, calculated that the population of Bastrop County has quadrupled since 1970: "The question is, will the public recognize that losses from such fires are mostly not the consequence of bad luck or fate, but bad planning?"

"Planning," of course, is an expletive in the libertarian-leaning politics of Texas.

Another is FEMA – the Federal Emergency Management Agency. In Perry's campaign manifesto, Fed Up!, FEMA looms as a classic example of the slow-acting, heavy-handed Washington bureaucracy he hopes to dismantle as president.

Would you care to guess which agency arrived in Bastrop County, got temporary housing vouchers into the hands of the displaced families, and helped underwrite the cleanup of debris? You don't hear a lot of FEMA-bashing in Bastrop County.

www.traidingsuccess.com, slogan:  'We give more; take less!'

Sunday, October 09, 2011

'Imagination more important than knowledge (science)!' A. Einstein

How a Physicist Sees the Universe: Messy and Sublime

Theoretical physicist Lisa Randall thinks about many things. Not just particle physics and cosmology, which are her forte, but also about the process of science, the nature of risk and uncertainty and even the approach that art and religion take to understanding the world.

In her latest book, Knocking on Heaven's Door: How Physics and Scientific Thinking Illuminate the Universe and the Modern World, Randall writes about some of the most important scientific quests of today: the search for the Higgs boson, unraveling the mystery of dark matter and dark energy, and the possibility of discovering new physics at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. Expanding beyond this scope, though, she also presents a scientists' take on topics ranging from the recent financial crisis to the role of asymmetry in art.

Wired recently sat down with Randall to talk about her view of the universe.

Wired: Your book seems to be mainly about two things: the current state of particle physics and the process of science. Why did you choose to write on these two topics together?

Lisa Randall: Firstly, I didn't want to just do what I had done in my previous book, Warped Passages: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe's Hidden Dimensions; I wanted to do something interesting that was different.

So really the seed for the book was to go into this idea of the nature of science. I think it's an interesting story just how science is done, and I think that process tends to get oversimplified and overstated a lot of the time.

Having decided to do that, I thought I should round it with actual science. So I also write about the current state of particle physics and the Large Hadron Collider. People can get so caught up in thinking, you know, this is all so abstract but I think it's important to understand that there are concrete testable results.

Wired: You write that the process of science can be complicated and messy. Why do you think it's important for readers to know that?

Randall: There can sometimes be this fear among laypeople: I don't understand everything in science perfectly so I just can't say anything about it. I think it's good to know that we scientists are also confused some of the time. This way we can invite others in. They can participate in understanding, and apply scientific methods to other contexts in their lives.

The process of science is difficult and challenging. It involves always being aware that your ideas might be right or they might be wrong. I think it's that kind of balance that makes science so interesting. I mean, if we had all the answers already, that would be a lot less exciting as a research field.

Wired: Speaking of challenges, there was coincidentally a large news story the week your book came out about faster-than-light neutrinos.

Randall: I think it was a really great example of how the process of science works. You have this solid ground that you really understand but then sometimes you find these little holes that might actually reveal whole new worlds that lie underneath. I mean, for various reasons I think this [faster-than-light neutrino] result will go away. But I don't think it was wrong to present it, and it wasn't wrong to try and find out if it was right.

And what's really important to remember is that new results don't always make the old theory wrong. This is a really important and basic concept that's often misunderstood. A lot of people are very critical here. They say, "Why are you doing science if you're just going to find out it's all wrong anyway?" But that's just not how it works.

Even if the results turn out to be true, it would tell us that Einstein's theory is still right over a large regime. But we would then know that there are some deeper underlying differences that apply when you do these extremely precise measurements. Usually, when a new theory is shown to be right, it simply underlies the old one, which is now an approximation. It doesn't mean we need to throw away the old theory.

Wired: You write about risk and uncertainty from a scientific perspective: How can people apply these ideas in their lives?

Randall: One example from the recent financial crisis was when bankers and economists were evaluating risk. They allowed for some variation in how the economy would grow, and maybe they even thought it could go down a little bit. But they didn't account for the possibility that it could go down by as much as it did. Now I would say it was clear that the previous decade was a bit anomalous. So you might want to allow for this variation, account for your uncertainties and then evaluate your risk within that context.

Another point to look at is scale. When we evaluate risk, why do so many people get so many different answers? Well, Goldman-Sachs might be evaluating risk for them, while the US government might want to know what is the risk to the economy as a whole. And I might want to know what is the risk to my pension fund. Those are different questions and they are over different timescales. I think for these problems it can help to understand how a scientist would approach them, looking at them with rational critical reasoning over different scales.

Wired: Besides the title, which comes from a Bob Dylan song, you mention art a lot in the book: using examples from poetry, sculpture, painting. What is your relationship with art?

Randall: I grew up in New York City. I went to museums so much as a kid, and I guess I didn't realize how much it affected me. I don't necessarily make much art myself, but after I wrote Warped Passages, I was fortunate to get involved a little in the art world. I got invited to write a libretto for what we called a projective opera, and I also got invited to curate an art exhibit.

These things gave me the chance to really work collaboratively with artists and composers. We all got together to envision what the opera would look like and what the story would be. It was really an amazing experience as a physicist to go and see your words sung on a stage by amazing people. The performers were fantastic and the show, [Hypermusic Prologue: A Projective Opera in Seven Planes], premiered at the Center Pompidou in Paris. I couldn't have been luckier at having been given this opportunity.

Wired: In the book you present this almost heretical idea about beauty. Scientists are often quoted saying that a true theory is always beautiful, while you say maybe, maybe not.

Randall: It's funny, because beauty is framed by your experience and your tastes. While there are probably some fundamental underlying core truths that we might agree on, if a string theorist really showed you their equations, you might have a hard time appreciating it. So I wanted to bring up the point that it's not just a simple criterion, and it's very subjective in some ways.

Perhaps it was part of my attempt to counter the story that science is always so pristine and beautiful. I think part of what makes the world interesting is that it's messy. I mean, part of what makes art beautiful is that symmetries are broken. So I think that's an important thing to keep in mind as we are discovering the underlying principles to the natural world. A part of the art of science is trying to find out why the world isn't quite as beautiful as we'd like it to be.

Wired: A large portion of the book is devoted to the Large Hadron Collider. As a scientist, how did it feel when you first saw the machine?

Randall: I was really fortunate when I first came to ATLAS [one of the six main LHC experiments]. I was being taken around by Peter Jenni and Fabiola Gianotti, who are experts on the experiment. It's not just a big machine, it's also very precise, and I got to hear the detailed stories about how precise it was and how carefully every aspect was thought through. It was really amazing. And, really, it's just big and beautiful. You can't help but want to snap pictures. I mean, the colors, the lines, it's amazingly well constructed.

Wired: The LHC is poised to make many discoveries. Looking five years ahead, what would you hope has come out of the experiments?

Randall: I certainly hope we'll know about the Higgs sector, which has to do with how particles acquire their mass. That was important enough that I devoted a whole chapter in the book to why we're looking for the Higgs boson, what it would tell us if we find it and what it means if we don't.

And then there are other questions about why particles have the mass they do, and that could have to do with supersymmetry, which is an extension of space-time symmetry, or it could have to do with extra dimensions.

I mean, I'd like to say that in five years we would know more about all these ideas. But I'm probably not naturally the most optimistic person. I'm cautious, so I'm a little afraid that new physics might be at sufficiently high energy that it would take even more than a few years to find it. But we certainly will know more about anything at these lower energies, and ultimately I would hope that we find some evidence of supersymmetry, extra dimensions or something else that we haven't even thought of yet.

Wired: What are the next frontiers in physics, the next things we might possibly have evidence of?

Randall: There's this idea of warped extra dimensions, which would be an extremely exciting possibility. It's the idea that there's another universe really close to us that affects us only through gravity. It could even affect the masses of particles that we see. It has experimental consequences that we could see at the Large Hadron Collider, so it's rather exciting.

Wired: What are some key things you hope people take away from your book after reading it?

Randall: I hope people have a better appreciation for both science itself and why we scientists are excited about it. I want people to understand what new discoveries mean. When they see a new result in the newspaper, I want people to be able to evaluate it and see what really goes into a scientific discovery.

I hope the book inspires them to approach the world a little more scientifically, and think about the role of uncertainty, the role of probability, what it means to be right and wrong; not be afraid of these things but to really understand them. When you talk about uncertainty, people tend to get confused and think you're indecisive or whatever, but I think part of making sound decisions is understanding uncertainty and risk.

Images: 1) ESA/Hubble, NASA and H. Ebeling 2) Christopher Kim

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